NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX

Xavier NX! Today NVIDIA announces the Jetson Xavier NX module.

NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX (Image courtesy of NVIDIA)

Xavier NX Overview

The Jetson Xavier NX module is the newest member of the Jetson family of devices. The architecture is similar to the powerful Jetson AGX Xavier. The Xavier NX has a 6 core Carmel ARM CPU, and a 384 core Volta GPU. Also, the Xavier NX has dual NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) engines.

The Xavier NX contains 8GB of 128 bit memory. There are two power modes, 10W and 15W, with up to 21 TOPS of AI performance. The edge connector for the module is a 260-pin SODIMM edge connector, 70x45mm. You may recognize this as the same connector as the Jetson Nano Developer Kit. The module is compatible with the Jetson Nano Developer Kit! It even runs at 5V.

Yes, but will this dog hunt?

Dustin Franklin wrote a very nice article on the Xavier NX, Introducing Jetson Xavier NX, the World’s Smallest AI Supercomputer. It’s well worth the read.

Not to steal all the thunder, but here’s a performance graph from the article:

Xavier NX performance
Xavier NX performance

As we can see, this slots performance as much higher than the Jetson TX2, and slightly less than the full Jetson AGX Xavier. Yes, this dog will hunt.

The packaging and power requirements means that this Jetson should be able to easily fit in the quickly growing Jetson Nano ecosystem. Why is this important? Because it means that if your project needs more computing horsepower, then there is a straightforward upgrade path to the Jetson NX.

The NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX will be available in March, 2020 for $399 in quantity.

Here are some more NVIDIA links:


Go check it out!

2 Comments

  1. Awesome! But for the price point, this is probably something you buy after experimenting with jetson nano and finding out, that you need much more performance 😉

    • That sounds right. I think a lot of people don’t have a good feel for how much performance a given dev kit actually has, especially an entry level one. It’s fine if you buy too much computing power, but if you don’t buy enough it’s nice to know that there is an upgrade path available. For people creating actual products, it simplifies their designs in the sense that they only have to design for one module footprint. This was true of the TX1 to TX2. The AGX Xavier has a slightly different footprint from those, but it seems like for a more mainstream ecosystem it would be great to piggy back on to the SO-DIMM format. Thanks for reading!

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